To update and amend

file_001

When I was first putting together Iard Fach – in a scenic sense – I had a tight deadline to work to so I wanted simple and quick placeholder buildings. These were ‘knocked together’ in a rush from various kit bits that I was given by my father. He had them stored in his garage after being given them by a member of his garden railway club.

file_001

 

I was initially happy with what I had achieved for the layout, but the idea has always been to improve on the foundation I had built and further develop the board until I felt it was more up-to-standard – with my previous post I show the beginning of this with a new building built from blocks of card. This holds a new challenge for me in scratch building 4mm scale buildings, and also consumes more time than my previous efforts, but I feel the effect is more than worth the time invested into the project. The roof tiles are watercolour paper cut into strips and sliced at 5mm intervals, once glued down I tease the edges of some tiles apart to get some variety from the tiles but also add a bit of texture and depth to the little structure. Below you can see the completed structure – awaiting paint and the addition of a lean-to which will be built from plasticard and card – then house some junk to add character. I’m tempted to also drape a tarpaulin off the roof too, we’ll see.

file_000

Now, from the smallest structure on the layout, to the largest…the new engine shed. This card carcass will be clad with a card block (stone) base, then timber at the top – I feel the mix of materials will work well and add to the railways rustic shoe-string-budget atmosphere and give a point of interest on the station side of the layout. I think the hardest part of the build will be decorating and detailing the interior, but we’ll see what can be done there. Hopefully the next update will show this building in a progressed state.

Many thanks for reading – see you in the next update.

file_000

Advertisements

Up to date

So the blog has been greatly neglected this year, I have made a grand total of something in the region of seven posts. Now this is partly because I have not been doing a great amount of modelling this year and when I have there isn’t really too much to say about it. ‘I painted a coach today’ isn’t the most exciting of topics for writing or reading material, plus about a month later I stripped the paint off and re-painted it.

bw1

bw2

I managed to get basic scenery on Iard Fach finished in time for a show in June, then the layout sat in the office for a couple of months while I worked and worked and worked. As a matter of fact, since I decided to go freelance earlier in the year I have barely stopped working, not because I need or have to, it’s just the nature of the business I guess. But this week I have started making a conscious effort to get back into the swing of doing smaller projects amounting to a much better amount of progress.

shd4

Now I have an idea of what I can achieve in the small time frames I set myself, for example, flattening an area and re-laying grass? Thirty minutes max, including hoovering and tidying afterwards. The sidings side of Iard Fach were going to be developed into a timber yard, I had made up some buildings and cleared the space but I decided ultimately this would distract from the open and backwater atmosphere – So I re-laid the greenery keeping the area’s flatness, and it will be populated with a stone building, and some junk…slightly raised to appear like a make-shift platform for staff to load / unload wagons.

1

3

Now is the scenic work only took about thirty minutes, you’d think making a building would take about the same amount of time right? You’d be wrong. Two hours, thirty minutes into construction, this is how the little building looks. It’s footprint is 40mm  x 35mms, and its roughly 40mm tall with the slanted roof reducing this to 38mm(ish). This will look great when completed and is worth the time investment in my opinion, but I certainly don’t think I’ll be doing an engine shed using this method…it’d take weeks – but then the trade off would be it would look great.

shed

shed2

I think keeping the buildings small and ‘rough around the edges’ will add character to the layout – keeping in mind there isn’t a huge amount of them to see,  so at least they will be interesting to look at when they catch the eye or if something isn’t moving. The kick-back siding will be grassed up a little and used as an area to ‘dump’ wagons or locos.

IMG_1599

 

 

The station side is going to be getting a healthy dose of grass too, and a renewed station area, the water tower will move to the loop away from the engine shed, and the station building will have a little change to something possibly ‘stone’ similar to the building I am constructing for the sidings. But that’s all in good time. At the rate of current progress, maybe the sidings will be done in the next couple of days and then the station area can be developed/improved over the next little while. Let’s hope the next update isn’t so far away!

Nearly there…

And so the layout is nearly basic scenic completion, with one little corner in need of covering/finishing up. The engine shed area is something I have wanted on a layout since I returned to modelling in 2010, so you can imagine how excited I am to get this together.

lt1

Hopefully you can spot the embryonic water tower…an attempt at adding some quirk and character to the scene, there will also be a small coaling stage. Wagon and coaches are suitably dirty…and station building now needs ‘grounding in’.

Also…my bachmann Skarloey is in the workshop waiting for re-painting…scary!

sk1

Iard Fach – The trees

Around 10 trees per pizza base for painting...three bases in total
Around 10 trees per pizza base for painting…three bases in total

I remember deliberating so much over the trees for Ted’s Yard…this time I knew exactly what I wanted from my trees. But I couldn’t afford ready made models. So I had to go the old sea moss and scatter route. That being said, I really enjoyed the process this time, and took more time to choose suitable specimens from my selection of boxes. I still have two and a half boxes full – so well worth the investment from Model Scenery Supplies who’s services was quick and simple to use and timely with delivery. (No affiliation just a happy customer).

train
Pre-tree placement on the siding side of the layout

This time I painted the ‘trees’ black before spraying with extra hold hairspray and dipping into scatter…a fun process that actually only took an hour to complete thirty one trees start to finish.

A view of the first planted trees lining the hill
A view of the first planted trees lining the hill

Planting has begun and the tree’s look rather effective in place. They are rather fine, but that’s not a complaint, I like their light appearance, if I ever invest in ready made larger trees they’ll offer some variety. I still have loads of trees to plant, and many more specimens to use up – but for £10 more than Gaugemaster’s box of seamoss, I easily for times the amount of stuff to play with…just something to keep in mind in the future.

Here is how the trees hold up to closer scrutiny...so many more to add....
Here is how the trees hold up to closer scrutiny…so many more to add….

I also made the decision to change what will occupy the engine shed area…I thought perhaps a simple loco service area would look better, a simple water tower and a coaling stage, after all this is the top of the line and though many lines had a shed at the top….mine doesn’t (anymore) and instead locos take on coal and water ready to roll back towards the seaside. Oh…I also decided rather than a nice little stone hut, I’d try an old grounded wagon as a ‘building’ on the siding side of the layout…

side

I think it works, but nothing is glued yet and it’s not over until the fat bloke sings. Lots to get on with!

Green and Grey

With renewed vigor, I have been attacking the scenic parts of the layout and trying to get buildings together as well. The grass has grown, bushes are developing and the engine shed and station buildings are now standing. Pictures below show the developments, more to come.

a1
The O&K passes the newly-fronted engine shed
A side-elevation shows the origins of the shed building...an old Ratio station building kit. Reminds me faintly of Pendre shed on the TR
A side-elevation shows the origins of the shed building…an old Ratio station building kit. Reminds me faintly of Pendre shed on the TR
The station shelter is a very tiny, simple affair, this is, after all, a rather poor little railway struggling to stay open
The station shelter is a very tiny, simple affair, this is, after all, a rather poor little railway struggling to stay open
And here the hut sits in-situ with a lightly raised 'station platform' area that will blend into the surrounding scenics
And here the hut sits in-situ with a lightly raised ‘station platform’ area that will blend into the surrounding scenics
Following along the line around the bend, we have an area of heavy foliage waiting for tree/s to finish, the dark area in the rear to the left is where the engine shed goes
Following along the line around the bend, we have an area of heavy foliage waiting for tree/s to finish, the dark area in the rear to the left is where the engine shed goes – I like the grass scatter on the track I may glue it there…
The siding has gained a work-mans hut needing a good roughing up
The siding has gained a work-mans hut needing a good roughing up
And we end with a view of the line that will mostly be populated by trees, all down the right side, and up the grassy hill in the centre, too.
And we end with a view of the line that will mostly be populated by trees, all down the right side, and up the grassy hill in the centre, too.

 

Iard Fach – 009

So, Lagom as a concept was great. But I have changed direction to Welsh narrow gauge, inspired by the Talyllyn Railway. My Boyd book really helps the creative juices flowing and the layout has really taken shape in recent week.

ok2

Here is the rear ‘yard’ side, this will have a small quarry siding with a little platform and space to leave wagons.

ok4

And here is the station side, recently rocked and painted – trees and over growth will line the top helping everything blend more naturally.

ok5

In the Boyd book there is a rather evocative photograph of Abergynolwyn in the late 30’s, showing the rustic nature of the line and track work – I’m hoping after some development this will be a similar scene with trees and overgrowth decorating the scene and filling the gaps.

Lagom development

My 009 Swedish Narrow Gauge railway is starting to become a scenic layout….slowly but surely.

First we have a light scarrering of ballast….
lagom1

I really hate ballasting just so we are clear….however, this is necessary and is only a bottom layer for das clay to adhere to

lagom3

The track will be near-enough buried, I have some pictures from google below showing the effect we are aiming for here…the station has found it’s place, and I got brave.

lagom2

I chopped a small section of the front board away so that the station will appear ‘nestled’ amongst trees and greenery, but be easy for viewers to see.

Hopefully…the pictures below will be a reflection of the model in time, but it’s going to take some work!

Disclaimer: I do not own the copyright to these images they are the work of the original photographer.

lagom4

lagom 5

lagom6

I now have a deadline of June to get this layout and Ted’s yard together and ready…so the work here will hopefully increase 🙂